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Home > Welcome to Augusta Township > TOWNSHIP SERVICES > High (Flooding) & Low (Drought) Water Conditions

High (Flooding) & Low (Drought) Water Conditions

south nation river, taken from the Charleville bridge March 18, 2020                                    dry creek bed

map showing where approximately the 3 different conservation authorities have authority within the township

This page is dedicated to providing the most current and up-to-date information regarding high (possible flood) and low (possible drought) water conditions.

New information will appear at the top of the page.

Visit Water Use It Wisely.com for ways you can help conserve water during drought conditions.

To be added to the River Watch newsletter email list or if you have questions regarding this information, please contact Hans Werner-Mackeler, Community Emergency Management Coordinator (CEMC) at emergplan@augusta.ca.

 


South Nation Conservation Authority Watershed Conditions: Flood Watchwatershed conditions flood watch logo

Environment Canada is forecasting mild temperatures throughout the week, reaching daytime temperatures of 8 o C, and the potential for significant periods of rain towards the end of the week and into the weekend totaling up to 40 mm by Saturday, March 26th.

As a result of updated rainfall amounts in the forecast, and the potential for increased water levels, South Nation Conservation (SNC) is upgrading from a FLOOD OUTLOOK to a FLOOD WATCH.

With water levels already elevated, and increased runoff expected to continue due to warmer temperatures, ongoing snow melt, and additional forecasted rainfall, the risk of flooding in areas adjacent to watercourses is heightened. Rising water levels and flows will create hazardous conditions close to any river, stream, or waterbody in the South Nation River watershed.

Residents are advised to exercise extreme caution when near rivers and waterbodies as the forecasted weather may rapidly increase river flows and cause slippery conditions. Parents are encouraged to explain these dangers to their children. 

Visit the South Nation Conservation Authority’s website to read the full statement.

Posted March 24, 2022

 


South Nation Conservation Authority Watershed Conditions: Flood Outlook (Update #1)South Nation Conservation Flood Outlook logo

Environment Canada is forecasting milder temperatures throughout the week, reaching daytime temperatures of 8 oC, and periods of rain towards the end of the week and into the weekend totaling up to 17 mm by Saturday, March 26th.

Warmer temperatures, snow melt and rainfall will maintain the current high water levels and may result in nuisance flooding in low-lying areas across the jurisdiction. Unstable ice conditions will also result from warmer temperatures and higher flows. 

Residents are advised to exercise extreme caution when near rivers and waterbodies as the forecasted weather may rapidly increase river flows and cause slippery conditions. Parents are encouraged to explain these dangers to their children.

Visit the South Nation Conservation Authority’s website to read the full statement.

Posted March 23, 2022


South Nation Conservation Authority Watershed Conditions Statementsouth nation conservation authority watershed conditions logo - flood outlook statement

Environment Canada is forecasting milder temperatures through the week, reaching daytime highs of 8 to 15 oC, and rainfall over the weekend totaling up to 50 mm by late Sunday, March 20th.

Runoff is expected due to warmer temperatures, melting snow, and forecasted rainfall. This will lead to increased water levels and flows across the SNC jurisdiction. Ice breakup is also expected.

Warmer temperatures, snow melt and rainfall will produce higher water levels and possible nuisance flooding in low-lying areas across the jurisdiction. Unstable ice conditions will also result from warmer temperatures and higher flows.

Residents are advised to exercise extreme caution when near rivers and waterbodies as the forecasted weather may rapidly increase river flows and cause slippery conditions. Parents are encouraged to explain these dangers to their children.

Visit the South Nation Conservation Authority’s website to read the full statement.

March 16, 2022


Rideau Valley Conservation Authority Watershed Conditions StatementRideau River Flood Status- Flood Watch

Warm temperature and potential rain may raise water levels in local watercourses and pose a safety hazard.

Visit the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority’s website to read the full statement.

 

Posted March 15, 2022


Riverwatch logo

River Watch 2022 # 1

Unlike last year at this time when levels were drawn down below its long-term average, Lake Ontario presently (Feb. 17) is at 0.21 metres (9.69 inches) above normal. Outflows have been increased for some time in accordance with Plan 2014. Inflows, heavy rain, and runoff may change the situation this spring.

The International Joint Commission (IJC), in February 2020, initiated a review of the outflow management plan (Plan 2014) for Lake Ontario. Phase 1 of the project, called the Expedited Review of Plan 2014, focused on providing information quickly enough to aid the response to any near-term recurrence of extreme high-water events. The IJC had indicated that the evidence was clear that natural factors and weather patterns caused the high-water conditions in 2017 and 2019. However, the IJC ordered the expedited review based on stakeholder requests to determine if Plan 2014 may also have played a role.

The Expedited Review of Plan 2014 has been released and is open to public feedback for a 60-day period (ending April 18th). If you would like to keep in touch with this process, please follow along at http://ijc.org/en. I’ve included a copy of the report for your reference.

If you would like to be added to the River Watch bulletins, please send an email to emergplan@augusta.ca.

Posted February 22, 2022


Level 1 Low Water Advisory Terminated for South Nation River Watershed

south nation conservation authority's normal low water conditions logo

On November 2nd, 2021, South Nation Conservation’s (SNC) Water Response Team voted to terminate the Level 1 Low Water Advisory across the South Nation River Watershed.

A Level 1 Low Water Condition was initially declared on June 4th, 2021, due to a drier than usual spring, persistent hot temperatures, and lack of precipitation throughout the months of May and June. Above average rain received throughout the month of July aided in restoring river flows and precipitation amounts to normal conditions, supporting the Water Response Team’s action to lift the Level 1 Low Water Advisory on August 4th, 2021. However, due to sporadic rainfall and low river flows, the Water Response Team voted to reinstate the Level 1 Low Water Advisory across the South Nation Watershed on September 9, 2021.

Read the full notice on the South Nation Conservation Authority’s Website.

 

 

Posted November 4, 2021


Watershed Conditions: Water Safety Statement from the South Nation Conservation AuthoritySNCA Watershed Conditions Water Safety Statement logo

Weather Forecast:
Rainfall amounts are forecasted to reach up to 60 mm by early Sunday morning.

Environmental Conditions:
The South Nation River Watershed is currently in a Level 1 Low Water Condition; however, river flows are expected to increase quickly due to expected rainfall.

Risks:
Rainfall is likely to produce higher water levels and possible nuisance flooding in low-lying areas across the jurisdiction.

ACTION:
Residents are advised to exercise caution when near rivers as the forecasted weather may rapidly increase river flows and cause slippery riverbanks. Parents are encouraged to explain these dangers to their children.

Duration:
This water safety statement is in effect until Tuesday, October 19, 2021 at 5 PM or until an update has been issued.

To read the full statement, visit the South Nation Conservation Authority’s website.

Posted October 15, 2021


Low Water Status Returned to “Normal” in Rideau Valley Watershed

Watershed conditions in the Rideau Valley Watershed have returned to “Normal’ under the Ontario Low Water Response Program.

With above average rainfall amounts across the watershed over the last month, stream flows and water levels have recovered from the previous low water status and are now above average for this time of year.

To read the complete statement, visit the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority website.

Posted October 6, 2021


Environmental Conditions:

The South Nation River Watershed is currently experiencing a minor drought (Level 1 – Low Water Condition), with river flows that are below normal for this time of year. Water flows are expected to increase over the coming days with the forecasted rainfall.

Risks:

Rainfall is likely to produce higher water levels and possible nuisance flooding in low-lying areas across the jurisdiction.

ACTION:

Residents are advised to exercise caution when near rivers as the forecasted weather may rapidly increase river flows and cause slippery riverbanks. Parents are encouraged to explain these dangers to their children.

Duration:
This water safety statement is in effect until Monday, September 27, 2021, at 5:00 PM or until an update has been issued.

SNC monitors the water levels and weather forecasts as part of the Flood Forecasting and Warning Program. Updates are provided as conditions change.

Please visit www.nation.on.ca for more information. To provide feedback with respect to changes in water related conditions please email waterwatch@nation.on.ca, post on our Facebook (/SouthNationConservation) or Twitter (@SouthNationCA).

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Katherine Watson, Water Resources Specialist – Monitoring, 1-877-984-2948, kwatson@nation.on.ca.

To read the statement, visit the South Nation Conservation Authority’s website.

Posted September 23, 2021


Watershed Conditions Statement from the Rideau Valley Conservation Authorityrideau valley conservation authority logo for watershed conditions statement - water safety

Environment Canada is forecasting rainfall amounts of 60 to 90 mm starting today through early Friday morning, with a few localities possibly exceeding 100 mm. The higher amounts are forecasted for the upper part of the Rideau Valley Watershed. This widespread rainfall event is due to a cold front and a moisture-laden low pressure system that will arrive from the American Midwest.

Because the Rideau Valley Watershed is currently in a “minor low water condition,” all water levels and flows are currently below normal, so significant flooding is not expected. However, this large rain event will cause all water levels and flows to increase rapidly and could cause localized flooding in small watercourses, urban areas and ditches. 

The RVCA reminds the public to exercise extreme caution around all waterbodies and remind children about the dangers of playing near open water. Residents are reminded to make sure their sump pumps are in good working condition and to help reduce ponding by keeping ditches, culverts, and storm drains clear of obstructions.

This watershed conditions statement is in effect until Tuesday, September 28, 2021 at 5 PM or until an update has been issued.

To read the statement, visit the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority’s website.

Posted September 22, 2021


Level 1 Low Water Advisory for the South Nation River Watershed

South Nation Conservation’s (SNC) Water Response Team voted to reinstate the Level 1 Low Water Advisory across the South Nation River watershed on September 9th, 2021,
due to sporadic rainfall and low river flows.

Visit the South Nation Conservation Authority’s website to read the full statement.

Posted September 13, 2021


Minor Low Water Conditions Persist Due to Warm, Dry August

The Rideau Valley Water Response Team is maintaining a MINOR low water status for the Rideau River watershed after officials met to discuss conditions on Wed. Sept. 8. This low water status is a result of a warm and dry August.

Watershed residents and businesses are encouraged to voluntarily reduce their water usage by 10 percent. This is especially important for those who have water-taking permits from surface or groundwater sources, as well as residents on private, communal, or municipal wells.

Visit the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority’s website to read the full statement.

Posted September 9, 2021


Despite recent rain, minor low water conditions continue in Rideau Valley Watershed

August 10, 2021

Despite recent rain, the Rideau Valley Water Response Team is maintaining a MINOR low water status for the Rideau River watershed after officials met to discuss conditions on Tuesday, August 10.

Watershed residents and businesses are encouraged to continue to voluntarily reduce their water usage by 10 percent. This is especially important for those who have permits for taking water from surface or groundwater sources and all residents on private, communal or municipal wells.

Visit the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority’s website to read the full statement.

Posted August 10,2021


Low Water Advisory Ended for South Nation River Watershed

South Nation Conservation’s (SNC) Water Response Team has terminated the Low Water Advisory across the South Nation River watershed, effective Wednesday, August 4th, 2021.

Visit the South Nation Conservation Authority’s website to read the full media release.

Posted August 5, 2021


‘Minor’ Low Water Conditions Persist in Rideau Valley Watershed

July 6, 2021

The Rideau Valley Low Water Response Team is maintaining a MINOR low water status for the Rideau River watershed after officials met to discuss dry conditions on Tuesday, July 6.

Visit the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority’s website to read the full statement.

Posted July 6, 2021


July 6, 2021

Despite the rain received in the month of June, South Nation Conservation’s (SNC) Water Response Team upheld a Level 1 Low Water Condition for its entire watershed in Eastern Ontario on June 30, 2021.

Visit the South Nation Conservation Authority’s website to read the full statement.

Posted July 6, 2021


June 8, 2021

Due to below average rainfall over the last three months, conditions in the Rideau Valley Watershed now meet the threshold for Minor Low Water status under the Ontario Low Water Response Program.

Visit the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority’s website to read the full statement.

Posted June 8, 2021


South Nation Conservation Declares Level 1 Low Water Conditionsouth nation river at charleville - june 2, 2021

June 4, 2021

Despite the rain received last week, South Nation Conservation (SNC) has issued a Level I Low Water Condition for its entire watershed in Eastern Ontario. The Level 1 Conditions was declared due to a drier than usual spring and a general lack of precipitation. To learn more, please visit the SNCA’s website.

 

 

 

 

Posted June 7, 2021


Riverwatch logo

RIVER WATCH 2020 # 7

The attached release from the International Joint Commission indicates that the Commission has approved increased St. Lawrence River flows in January and February of 2021. Any continuation of those flows into March and beyond will require further Commission approval. However please note the qualifier highlighted in yellow.

Prepared: December 16, 2020

The International Lake Ontario- St. Lawrence River Board to Implement Strategy to Deviate from Plan 2014 this Winter

Date: December 11, 2020

The International Joint Commission (IJC) has approved the Board’s request for authority to deviate from Plan 2014, and as conditions permit, outflows from the Moses-Saunders dam on the St. Lawrence River can be increased to exceed Plan 2014 flows.

The risk of high water on Lake Ontario in 2021 is moderate due to persistent high-water levels on Lake Erie and the upper Great Lakes. This will cause inflows to Lake Ontario from Lake Erie to remain high over the coming winter months. The main driver of a high-water event in the Lake Ontario basin will depend on seasonal factors such as precipitation and snowpack runoff.

Since June, Lake Ontario levels have steadily declined to just above the seasonal long-term average. Levels remain well below those that would automatically grant the Board the authority to deviate from Plan 2014 outflows. The Board and IJC recognize the continued threats posed by high water supplies into the system and the risk of another high-water event in 2021. The Board will implement a deviation strategy to take advantage of opportunities that may arise through the winter.

The IJC has granted this authority under Condition J of its Orders of Approval, which allows for the testing of some regulatory deviation strategies from Plan flows.  This authority will begin on 1 January 2021 and continue through the end of February. This regulatory strategy will be reassessed in February and could be revised with a request for further deviation authority from the IJC should conditions warrant.  During this period flow limits are expected to pertain to low Lake St Lawrence levels, municipal water intakes and river ice formation. All deviation strategies, regardless of magnitude of impact, implemented by the Board in this time frame are intended to cumulatively reduce the risk of high-water impacts and balance the interests of other groups throughout the system.

There remains considerable uncertainty in the weather and water supply conditions between now and next spring. These natural, uncontrolled hydrologic factors are the primary driver of water level fluctuations on Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. If basin conditions are extremely wet, and similar to those observed in 2017 and 2019, no deviation strategy will prevent water levels that can cause flooding and damage shoreline properties. Providing those types of benefits are beyond the reach of water regulation and are more reliably addressed through coastal resilience and planning.

Information on hydrologic conditions, water levels and outflows, including graphics and photos, are available on the Board’s website and posted to the Board’s Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/InternationalLakeOntarioStLawrenceRiverBoard (English), and more detailed information is available on its website at https://www.ijc.org/en/loslrb.

Contacts:

Rob Caldwell:              (613) 938-5864      Rob.Caldwell@canada.ca

Bryce Carmichael:       (513) 418-8562     ILOSLRB-USSection@usace.army.mil

The International Lake Ontario – St. Lawrence River Board specifies the outflows from Lake Ontario, according to Plan 2014 as required in the 2016 Supplementary Order from the International Joint Commission. This plan was agreed to by the United States and Canada in December 2016 in an effort to improve environmental performance while maintaining most of the benefits provided to other interests by the previous Plan 1958-D, which was in use since 1963. In determining outflows, the Board, in conjunction with its staff, pays close attention to water levels in the Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River system and on the Great Lakes upstream, and to the effects on stakeholders within the basin.  The IJC announced that they are reducing the size of the Board from 12 members to 6 members effective 1 December, 2020. The re-structured Board will continue to include one member each nominated by the Government of Canada, the Government of the United States, the Province of Quebec, the Province of Ontario and the State of New York and will include one additional member on the US side to ensure equal membership from both countries. Board members will continue to serve in their personal and professional capacity and consider interests of the entire Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River system. The Board’s online membership page has been updated to reflect this change. This re-structure does not fundamentally alter the process by which the Board makes regulatory decision.  All 6 previous Board members have been asked to serve on an Interim Advisory Group (IAG).  The IAG continues to attend meetings and their recommendations and input on regulatory decisions is still given significant weight in the Board’s final decision making process.

Water levels vary from year-to-year and throughout the year depending on weather and water supply conditions. Such variations benefit coastal wetlands and are critical to a healthy lake environment, but may at times and depending on individual circumstances increase the vulnerability of shoreline structures and reduce opportunities for recreational boating activities. The Board urges everyone to be prepared to live within the full range of levels that have occurred in the past and of those that may occur in the future. Based on historical observations and projected future conditions, at a minimum, Lake Ontario water levels are expected to range from a high of 75.92 m (249.1 ft.) to a low of 73.56 m (241.3 ft.) at infrequent intervals.  However, it is also recognized that future climate conditions are uncertain, and more extreme water levels may be reached and these extremes may occur more often.  Levels on the St. Lawrence River tend to vary more widely than on Lake Ontario. Also, these levels do not include the varying local effects of strong winds and wave action that significantly increase or decrease local water levels on both the lake and river, with temporary changes of over half a meter (two feet) possible in some locations.

For more information, please see the Board’s website (ijc.org/loslrb) and Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/InternationalLakeOntarioStLawrenceRiverBoard).To receive a weekly email about water levels and flows in the Lake Ontario–St. Lawrence River system, please send a blank e-mail message to

stlaw-L-subscribe@cciw.ca with the word ’subscribe’ in the title and body of your message.

Posted December 17, 2020